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Glossary

Adamnan of Iona

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Agamemnon Menelaus Dindon

A pet turkey.

Paragraph 126: First mention 

Aidan of Iona

A shepherd

Scene 28 

Alan of Bretagne

A Fir Tree.

Paragraph 142: Only mention 

Albério de Briançon

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Alcuin

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Alfric of Canterbury

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Anacreon Herodotus

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Andromeda

Sister hen Of Clementine.

Paragraph 434: First mention 

Angel Father

Opal believes that she was adopted into the Whiteley family when she was very young. She thinks her biological father has died and is now an angel in heaven, and so the name, Angel Father.

Paragraph 60: Angel Father's names

Paragraph 230: Angel Father's songs

Paragraph 335: About the book

About: Angel Mother 

Angel Mother

Opal believes that she was adopted into the Whiteley family when she was very young. She thinks her biological mother has died and is now an angel in heaven, and so the name, Angel Mother.

Paragraph 88: Angel Mother singing to Opal

Paragraph 263: Angel Mother's sayings

Paragraph 366: Writing in the special books

About: Angel Father 

Angel Mother and Angel Father

Opal believes she was adopted into the Whiteley family when she was very young. She thinks her biological parents have died and are now are now angels in heaven, and so calls them her Angel Mother and Angel Father.

Opal often misses her Angel Mother and Angel Father and tells many stories about them.

More about: Angel Father

More about: Angel Mother 

Anthonya Mundy

"Solomon Grundy's Little Pig Sister That Has Not Got As Much Curl In Her Tail As Has Solomon Grundy."

Paragraph 342: First mention

About: Solomon Grundy 

Aphrodite

Aphrodite is a pig and the mother of Solomon Grundy.

The name "Aphrodite" comes from the Greek's goddess of love and beauty. This is a good example of Opal's humor in naming her pets. Aphrodite is a very funny name for a mother pig.

Scene 9: The Blue Ribbon

About: Solomon Grundy 

Aristotle

"A Pet Bat Who Died Of Eating Too Many Mosquitoes."

The name Aristotle comes from a Greek philosopher who lived around 350 BC.

Paragraph 19: First mention  

Aunt

Opal's auntpossibly Etta Scott. Opal calls her simply the aunt .

Paragraph 323: a mention  

Blanche

A little tree by the great tree Edward III.

Paragraph 221: Only mention

About: Edward III 

William

A little tree by Edward III

Paragraph 221: Only mention

About: Edward III 

bean-folks

The bean-folks are the bean plants in the garden.

Paragraph 437: Only mention 

Bede of Jarrow

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 268: a mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Ben Jonson

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention  

Big black cat

A cat that lives on the farm.

Opal and the black cat and Opal are not very good friends because he likes to hunt Opal's animal friends.

Paragraph 20: Killing the mother hummingbird 

Big Jud

Big Jud is a classmate of Opal's.

Paragraph 56: First mention 

Brave Horatius

Brave Horatius was Opal’s pet German Shepherd dog. He goes with her everywhere.

Opal named him Brave Horatius after the Roman hero of the poem "Horatius at the Bridge" by Thomas Macaulay.

Paragraph 79: Brave Horatius thinks it is home-going time

Paragraph 105: A rescue by Brave Horatius

Scene 28: Brave Hortatius is lost and found again  

Byron

A Fir Tree In The Lane.

Paragraph 39: Only mention 

Cardinal Richelieu

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention  

Cassiopée

A Neighbor's Pig.

Paragraph 569: Only mention 

Charlemagne

"The Most Tall Tree Of All The Trees Growing In the lane"

Paragraph 326: Last mention 

Chore boy

Opal calls her young uncle Roy Scott the chore boy. He was about 20 at the time of the diary. Since he was alive when her diary was published his real name was changed.

Opal does not like him. She writes that he is mean to the old logging horse William Shakespeare and also kills her pet crow. Opal gets into trouble for using his poker chips to draw pictures upon.

Opal calls him the chore boy because he does work around the family farm. In other parts of her diary she calls him "Rob Ryder".

Paragraph 470: the poker chips

Paragraph 218: Rob Ryder & William Shakespeare

Paragraph 510: Rob Ryder & the pet crow  

Clementine

A Plymouth Rock Hen.

Paragraph 20: First mention 

Cynewulf

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Dallan Forgaill

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Dear Love and Her Young Husband

Dear Love is a neighbor and one of the McKibben family who own the "mill by the far woods". She is a friend of Sadie McKibben and is very kind to Opal.

Scene 56: A Visit With Dear Love and Husband

Scene 103: A Very Nice Visit

Scene 137: Going to see Dear Love Picture: McKibben and Patton family reunion in 1905 

Edmund Spenser

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention  

Edward III

"A Fir Tree Near The Singing Creek Where The Willows Grow."

Paragraph 221: Last mention 

Edward Prince of Wales

A Younger Tree Growing Near Unto Edward III.

Paragraph 221: Only mention

About: Edward III 

Edwin of Diera

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Elidor

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Elizabeth Barrett Browning is a cow living on the farm. Opal thinks of her as having "poetry In her tracks".

Elizabeth Barrett Browning is named for a famous English poet. The name may have been chosen because this is a Jersey cow, which are brown.

Paragraph 113: The tracks of Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Paragraph 467: Opal draws portraits on Poker chips

Paragraph 565: Getting the sunbonnet from Elizabeth Barrett Browning  

Elsie

Elsie and her young husband are Opal's aunt and uncle. They are neighbors and interesting friends. Opal believes the angels have brought them the wrong baby.

Scene 36: Elsie's brand new baby

Scene 37: A morning visit to the house of Elsie  

Epicurus Pythagoras

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Etienne of Blois

"A Fir Tree In The Woods."

Paragraph 142: Only mention 

Felix Mendelssohn

Felix Mendelssohn is a mouse which Opal often carries with her in a pocket.

This pet is named for a a famous German composer of music. He wrote the "wedding march" that is still used today.

Paragraph 554: Inspirations from dabbling toes  

Felix of Croyland

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 268: a mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Flower-folks

Flower-folks are the flowers around Opal's home that she likes to talk to.

Paragraph 379: Only mention 

Folks

Opal means her parents, Charles Edward Whiteley (born 1870 - died 1938) and Elizabeth Scott Whiteley (born 1874 - died 1917)

Opal does not believe that they were her real parents. She believed her real parents were dead. She calls them "Angel Mother" and "Angel Father".

Picture: Ed and Elizebeth Whiteley - wedding photo

Paragraph 1: a mention

More about: Angel Mother and Angel Father  

Francis Beaumont

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Françoise

Opal believes her real name is Françoise . It is French for Francis.

Opal hears the wind and trees call her "Come, petite Françoise." Later in life Opal called herself Françoise and this name is on her grave.

Paragraph 135: Voices in the wind

Paragraph 231: The bridge's squeaky boards  

Gentle Jersey cow

A cow that lives on Opal's farm and mother of the calf "Mathilde Plantagenet"

Paragraph 213: Naming the baby calf 

Geoffroi Chaucer

"A Little Squirrel That Was Hurt By The Black Cat."

Paragraph 586: First mention 

Girl who has no seeing

a blind friend of Opal's.

Her real name was Thelma Downes and she lived near Opal's school on Mosby Creek road across from the Stewart Covered Bridge. Thelma is the only friend that Opal takes exploring and teaches about the animals of the forest.

Thelma Downes died in a fire near her house in the spring of 1905. She was 25 years old.

Scene 23: Voices in the wind

Scene 24: Playing with the girl who has no seeing

Day 47: The death of the girl who has no seeing.  

Godefroi of Bouillon

"A Fir Tree In The Woods."

Paragraph 142: Only mention 

Good King EdwardI

"A Fir Tree Growing In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: First mention 

Grandma

The Grandma is Opal's grandmother Achsah Christopher Scott (b. 1853 - d. 1932). She is the mother of Opal's mother Elizabeth Whiteley, who Opal calls the "mamma" in the diary.

Scene 32: Coldness in the Outdoors More about: the mamma  

Grandpa

The grandpa was Opal's maternal grandfather, Leonidas Constantine Scott (b. 1851 - d.1944).

He owned the farm in Walden where Opal's family lived. He lived in the ranch-house.

Paragraph 74: Making potato piles Paragraph 1: the ranch-house Picture: Grandpa's ranch-house 

Grandpére

Grandpére is the French word for "grandfather." Opal uses Grandpére to mean the father of her "Angel Father."

Paragraph 578: Washing the picture of Angel Father

More about: Angel Father  

Guy de Cavaillon

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Gwian

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Harold

Elsie's oldest child.

Paragraph 440: Only mention About: Elsie 

Homer Archimedes Chilon

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Hugh Capet

"A Fir Tree Growing In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: First mention 

Isaiah

Isaiah is another dog of Opal's. She says that he is "a plain dog".

The name "Isaiah" comes from the name of a great prophet in the Bible. The Book of Isaiah in the Old Testament is written about him.

Paragraph mention326: Last mention 

Jean de La Fontaine

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: Only mention 

JeanMoliére

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Jean Racine

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: Only mention 

Jenny Strong

A friend of Opal's mother. Jenny Strong visits Opal's nursery and is scared off by the pet mouse.

Scene 46: Jenny Strong's Visit  

Jimmy

Jimmy is one of Opal's school mates.

Paragraph 56: Only mention 

John Fletcher

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

John of Gaunt

"A Tree Growing Near Unto Edward III."

Paragraph 221: First mention

About: Edward III 

Keats

"An Oak Tree In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: First mention 

King Edward III

King Edward III is a grand tree that Opal likes to go talk to.

Paragraph 219: First mention 

Larry and Jean

Larry and Jean are two of Opal's neighbors and family members. They were another of her aunt and uncles on her mother's side of the family.

Larry and Jean are newly weds who have a little baby that Opal loves very much. Opal writes that they had only been married "five months" when they had a baby.

Scene 7: Larry and Jean  

Lars Porsena of Clusium

Lars Porsena of Clusium was the name of Opal’s pet black crow.

The name comes from a king in ancient Rome in about 580 B.C., who is mentioned in Thomas Macaulay's poem "Horatius at the Bridge" (1842).

Paragraph 13: Finding the Mamma's thimble

Scene 80: The Death of Lars Porsena

Scene 118: The Death of Lars Porsena of Clusium  

Lionel, Duke of Clarence

"A Tree Growing Near Unto Edward III."

Paragraph 221: Only mention

About: Edward III 

Little gray one of the black cap

A small bird that Opal feeds, possibly a Chickadee.

Paragraph 193: First mention 

Wood-folk

Opal uses wood-folk to mean any of the small animals she sees in the forest.

Paragraph 135: First mention 

Lola

A classmate of Opal's.

Lola was several years older than Opal but they were in the same class in the Walden School. Loladied in the spring of 1905. Opal describes her funeral.

Scene XXX: Lola Saves Lucian Horace Ovid

Scene XXX: Lola Gets a White Silk Dress 

Louis II, Le Grand Condé

A wood-mouse. Opal often carries Louis II, Le Grand Condé in her sleeve.

The comes from a king of France

Scene 40: Sadie McKibben Has Understandings  

Louis VI

"A Grand Fir Tree In The Woods."

Paragraph 140: First mention 

Lucian Horace Ovid Virgil

A pet toad.

The name for this pet comes from putting together the names of four great teachers and poets in Ancient Rome: Lucian, Horace, Ovid and Virgil.

Paragraph 3 Scene 43 Paragraph 3: The toad under the house steps

Scene 43: Lola Saves Lucian Horace Ovid Virgil  

Madame Lapine

A rabbit

Paragraph 492: Only mention 

Mamma

The mamma is Opal's mother, Elizabeth Scott Whiteley ( b. 1874 - d. 1917).

Opal has a difficult time with her mother. While trying to be helpful, Opal often does things which make her mother angry.

In addition, Opal believes that her "Angel Mother," rather than Elizabeth Whiteley is her real mother.

Picture: Elizabether Whiteley

Picture: Mr and Mrs. Whiteley

Scene 15: Helping with Chores

Scene 30: Getting the Millers Brand out of the Flour-Sack

Scene 104: Tied to the woodshed corner  

Man that wears gray neckties

The man who wears gray neckties worked at the McKibben Mill and was known for being very kind to animals and children. He gave Opal pens and paper to write her diary with and often looks after her. His real name was George Miller.

Picture: George Miller Scene 13: Colored Pencils From the Fairies

Scene 62: The Death of William Shakespeare

Scene 114: Visiting Sadie McKibben and the Man Who Wears Gray Neckties Picture: people working at the McKibben mill in 1905 

Marcus Aurelius

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Martha

Martha is a classmate of Opal's.

Paragraph 62: Only mention 

Mathilde Plantagenet

The baby calf of the "gentle Jersey cow."

Paragraph 213: Naming the baby calf 

Menander Euripides Theocritus Thucydides

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona. Menander has been left with a mother and Opal takes care of it.

Paragraph 345: First mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Michael Angelo Sanzio Raphael

"A Grand Douglas Fir Tree With An Understanding Soul." Michael Angelo Sanzio Raphael is a tall fir tree that grows just back of the barn. Opal often climbs into it and has talks.

Opal names this tree after two great artists who lived at the same time, Michael Angelo and Sanzio Raphael.

Scene 3: The grand tree with an understanding soul

Paragraph 351/a>: Walking barefoot in the mud 

Minerva

Minerva is one of the hens in the hen house. Opal gave names to all of her chicks.

The name "Minerva" comes from the Roman goddess of work and the arts. Her role was similar to the Greek goddess Athena.

Scene 72: Naming Minerva's chicks  

Mrs. Limberger

Mrs. Limberger is a plump neighbor of Opal's who lives in a large house. The Limberger's also owned the lane where Opal walked.

The Limbergers were still alive when Opal's diary was published in 1920. Their real name was "Linebaugh" and they owned a large piece of land near Opal's family. Mr. N.J. Linebaugh was from Germany or one of the Scandinavian countries. He built several barns in the area using a type of wood work found on ocean ships.

Paragraph 546: Eggs for Mrs. Limberger

Scene 129: The Satin Rotten Eggs

Paragraph 38: The Lane 

Nannerl Mozart

"A Very Shy Mouse." Opal often carries Nannerl Mozart in a pocket

Paragraph 110: First mention 

Napoleon

The Rhode Island Red Rooster.

Paragraph 460: First mention 

new teacher

The new teacher is Mary Damewood Daugherty. She taught Opal in the Walden School in 1904 and1905.

Benjamin Hoff, who researched Opal’s life wrote "According to Opal’s family, she was able to form words from primers (elementary school books) at the age of three. At five she, she entered school, the youngest child in the community to do so. She passed two grade levels in her first year at Walden. (Benjamin Hoff, the Singing Creek Where the Willows Grow, Penguin Books, 1994, page 7 & 9)

Elbert Bede interviewed Mary Daugherty for his book, Fabulous Opal Whiteley, From Logging Camp to Princess of India (Binsfords & Mort, 1954, page 90)

"Opal’s first teacher told me the child was an unusually bright student, albeit given to day dreaming, and although the youngest pupil, passed two grades in one year. In this first school the teacher would read from Greek mythology and her pupils would put into story form what they could recollect. After the papers had been corrected by the teacher, her pupils would copy them into composition books.

It is believable that this school experience developed in little Opal an interest in ancient literature, and there are some who believe this at least partly explains the names with which the child diary named her pets. This teacher seems to have known that Opal kept a diary. She wished Opal to read it to her classes, but Opal denied the request."

Picture: Opal's Class

Picture: Opal's teacher, Mrs. Mary Daugherty 

Nicholas Boileau

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Oliver Goldsmith

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Orderic

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Padre Martini

A Locust

 

papa

The papa is Opal's father Charles Edward Whiteley (born 1870 - died 1938). He was a logger and worked for the Booth Kelly lumber company in Cottage Grove.

As with her mother, Opal tries to help her father with mixed results and believes that "Angel Father" is her real father.

Picture: Papa

Scene 57Scene 57: Trying to Help the Papa

Paragraph 152: The papa's big coat

About: Angel Father  

Peace

"A Mother Hen That Has Got All Her Children Grown Up."

Paragraph 403: Only mention 

Pearl

Pearl is the name of Opal's four year old sister. Pearl was born in 1899.

Pearl and Opal were not close sisters. In other parts of her diary Opal calls her simply "the little girl". They do not play with each other very much and did not like the same things.

Picture: Opal and Pearl

Scene 5: Queer Feels

Paragraph 463: Helping out  

Pensée girl

The pensée girl with the far-away look in her eyes is a young woman falls in love with a man who works at the McKibben's mill by the far woods. Opal calls him the "man of the long step that whistles most all of the time".

The word pensée is French and means thoughtful.

Paragraph 370: flowers foe the pensée girl

Scene 125: the pensée girl gets a wedding ring 

Periander Pindar

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Peter Paul Rubens

Opal named her pet pig Peter Paul Rubens.

Opal says that she named the baby pig Peter Paul Rubens because she first saw him on June 29th. This was the birthday of a popular portrait painter from Belgium, born on that day in 1577.

Opal tells many stories about Peter Paul Rubens. She often takes him exploring in the woods and one day he followed her to school.

Later however, Peter Paul Rubens is killed and Opal mourns for him for a long time.

Picture: A Pig like Opal's

More about: The painter

Paragraph 11: First mention

Scene 8: A pig at school

Scene 24: In the cathedral

Scene 27: On explores

Scene 29: Peter Paul Rubens dies

Scene 31: Mourning for Peter Paul Rubens

Paragraph 581: Last mention 

Pius VII

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Plant-folks

Plant-folks are the plants that grow on the farm that Opal likes to talk to.

Paragraph 379: First mention 

Plato

Plato is one of Opal's pet bats.

The name comes from a Greek philosopher who lived around 380 BC. He was one of the greatest of Greek philosophers and scientists - along with Aristotle and Socrates.

Paragraph 19: First mention 

Pliny

Pliny is one of Opal's pet bats.

The name comes from a Roman philosopher and scientist who lived around 75 BC. He wrote the first encyclopedia of science.

Paragraph 526: a description 

Plutarch Demosthenes

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: First mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Queen Eleanor of Castile

"A Fir Tree In The Lane Growing By Edward I."

Paragraph 61: First mention 

Queen Philippa of Hainault

"A Fir Tree Growing By Edward III."

Paragraph 221: Last mention

About: Edward III 

Raoul De Houdenc

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 168: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Raymond of Toulouse

"A Fir Tree In The Woods."

Paragraph 142: Only mention 

Rob Ryder

Rob Ryder is also called "the chore boy" in the diary. He was about 20 at the time of the diary. He was Opal's uncle, Roy Scott. Since he was alive when her diary was published his real name was changed.

Opal does not like him. She writes that he is mean to the old logging horse William Shakespeare and also kills her pet crow. Opal gets into trouble for using his poker chips to draw pictures upon.

Paragraph 470: the poker chips

Paragraph 218: Rob Ryder & William Shakespeare

Paragraph 510: Rob Ryder & the pet crow  

Sadie McKibben

Sadie McKibben is a neighbor and one of Opal's very best friends.

Sadie gave Opal paper and pencils for her writing and encouraged her in many ways.

Sadie's family owned the "mill by the far woods". She died giving birth on August 6, 1911. She is buried in Cottage Grove's Fir Grove Cemetery.

Picture: Sadie McKibben

Picture: McKibben and Patton family reunion in 1905

Scene 4: The Beauty of Sadie McKibben

Scene 65: Wash-day for Sadie McKibben

Scene 99: Sadie McKibben's hair 

Saint Louis

"A Fir Tree Growing In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: First mention 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: Only mention 

Savonarola

Savonarola is the name of Opal's horse.

She named him Savronarola because he is a sorrel (reddish colored horse)

The name Savonarola comes from Girolamo Savonarola, who was an Italian preacher, reformer and martyr of the 15th century. He was a cardinal in the Catholic church and wore red colored holy robes.

He was burned alive at the stake and became a martyr for reform in the church. There is a famous painting named Burning Savonarola . His birthday was September 21, 1452.

Scene 95: Opal meets Savonarola

More About: Girolamo Savonarola 

Shelley

"A Fir Tree Growing In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: Only mention 

Sir Francis Bacon

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Sir Philip Sidney

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: Only mention 

Sir Walter Raleigh

One Of Minerva's Baby Chickens.

Paragraph 353: First mention 

Solomon Grundy

Solomon Grundy is a pig living on the farm. His mother is "Aphrodite."

The name comes from one of the Mother Goose nursery rhymes.

Solomon Grundy becomes more important to Opal after the death of another of her favorite pigs, Peter Paul Rubens.

Scene 66: The Christening of Soloman Grundy

Scene 74: Solomon Grundy is Sick About: Peter Paul Rubens About: Aphrodite 

Solon Thales

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Sophocles Diogenes

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: First mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

teacher

The new teacher is Mary Damewood Daugherty. She taught Opal in the Walden School in 1904 and1905.

Benjamin Hoff, who researched Opal’s life wrote "According to Opal’s family, she was able to form words from primers (elementary school books) at the age of three. At five she, she entered school, the youngest child in the community to do so. She passed two grade levels in her first year at Walden. (Benjamin Hoff, the Singing Creek Where the Willows Grow, Penguin Books, 1994, page 7 & 9)

Elbert Bede interviewed Mary Daugherty for his book, Fabulous Opal Whiteley, From Logging Camp to Princess of India (Binsfords & Mort, 1954, page 90)

"Opal’s first teacher told me the child was an unusually bright student, albeit given to day dreaming, and although the youngest pupil, passed two grades in one year. In this first school the teacher would read from Greek mythology and her pupils would put into story form what they could recollect. After the papers had been corrected by the teacher, her pupils would copy them into composition books.

It is believable that this school experience developed in little Opal an interest in ancient literature, and there are some who believe this at least partly explains the names with which the child diary named her pets. This teacher seems to have known that Opal kept a diary. She wished Opal to read it to her classes, but Opal denied the request."

Picture: Opal's Class

Picture: Opal's teacher, Mrs. Mary Daugherty 

Man of the long step

The man of the long step that whistles most all of the time works at the mill and is in love with the pensée girl with the far-away look in her eyes.

Paragraph 370: flowers foe the pensée girl

Scene 125: the pensée girl gets a wedding ring 

Theodore Roosevelt

"A Fir Tree In The Lane."

Paragraph 326: Only mention 

Thomas Chatterton Jupiter Zeus

Thomas Chatterton Jupiter Zeus is the name to of a wood rat who is one of Opal's favorite pets.

Opal carries Thomas Chatterton Jupiter Zeus whenever she goes visiting or exploring. He rides in her pockets or in her hat. She writes that wood-rats are "soft and velvety", not like ordinary rats. They are larger and cleaner than other types of rats and can make good pets.

Opal named her pet wood-rat after the English poet Thomas Chatterton, and two gods of Roman and Greek mythology, Jupiter and Zeus.

Paragraph 3: first mention of a lovely wood rat

Paragraph 419: a rat's house

Scene 16: the sore nose and a cheese squeak

Paragraph 595: last mention

About: Jupiter

About: Zeus

About: the poet Thomas Chatterton

 

Tibullus Theognis

A Sheep, one of the flock of the shepherd Aidan of Iona.

Paragraph 347: Only mention

About: Aidan of Iona 

Uncle Henry

Uncle Henry is Opal's uncle who gave her a blue ribbon for her Sunday church clothes.

Uncle Henry was Opal's uncle Henry Pearson (b 1883 - d. 1916). He was Opal's favorite uncle. Opal changed his name to "Uncle Caleb" when he diary was reprinted again. He taught Opal many things about nature and natural history.

Paragraph 17: A blue ribbon for Aphrodite  

William Makepeace Thackeray

"A Little Bird That Was Hurt."

Paragraph 494: Only mention 

William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare is an old, gray work horse belonging to Opal's family.

Work horses are larger and stronger than other horses. Work horses are often very gentle and trained to respond to voice commands. They were used in both farming and logging before machines like tractors became available. Work horses are still used by many people around the world.

Opal says that William Shakespeare's "soul is very beautiful." She often goes to talk with and brings him nice things to eat like lumps of sugar. Once she took him for a long ride. Opal worries that Rob Ryder makes William work too hard. William Shakespeare is very old and one day he lays down and dies.

Opal named their old work horse William Shakespeare after the great English writer of the 1500's. Shakespeare wrote popular plays like Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet.

Picture: Work Horses

Paragraph 8: First mention

Day 25: Opal's long ride

Paragraph 196: Songs and snacks

Scene 52: William Shakespeare's death

Paragraph 581: Last mention

More about: the writer Shakespeare 

William Wordsworth

"An Oak Tree In The Lane."

Paragraph 39: First mention 

Baby

The baby is Opal's younger sister Faye. Opal often takes care of Faye for her mother.

Picture: Opal and her sisters Faye and Chloe

Paragraph 332: tending the baby 

shepherd

A shepherd who Opal names "Aidan of Iona". Opal gives names to many of the sheep in this man's flock.

Scene 28 

little girl

The little girl is Opal's four year old sister. Pearlwas born in 1899.

Pearl and Opal were not close sisters. They do not play with each other very much and did not like the same things.

Picture: Opal and Pearl

Scene 5: Queer Feels

Paragraph 463: Helping out  

Harold

Elsie's oldest child.

Paragraph 440: Only mention About: Elsie 

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Last updated: February 7, 2002